Topics

Module description:

The course will provide learners with an introduction to the knowledge, skills and techniques necessary to learn about and communicate the history of an urban landscape. The course will use a combination of lectures and instructor led group visits (all within Highfield and Portswood) to acquaint learners with key sources of historical information. We will examine church, domestic and industrial architecture, cemeteries and churchyards, historical archives, museum collections and web-based collections. The course will also examine the use of parish records, censuses, certified records, and resources from county record offices, such as poor law and rate books. The use of old maps and directories will also be covered.

Learners will learn to locate, interpret and document each of these sources of historical information. Learners will then learn to compile these findings into a clear and confidently written or presented historical account summarising the history and development of a particular urban area. Learners will be introduced to online publications, which will enable them to effectively communicate their research to a wider audience.

Session Outline

At the end of each week, the module website will be updated with materials from the previous session. https://urbarch.wordpress.com/

The module will consist of twelve sessions as follows:

Week 1

4/10/12

What is Urban Archaeology?

Gareth and Nicole Beale

Avenue Campus: Building 65a Room 3043

Description: In this session we will introduce ourselves and will discuss the meaning of Urban Archaeology, as well as outlining the plans for the next eleven sessions.

Week 2

11/10/12

Web-based Collections

Gareth and Nicole Beale

Avenue Campus: Building 65a Room 3043

Description: This will be a practical session on the use of web-based resources for historical and archaeological research.

Week 3

 

18/10/12

Churches: A Spotter’s Guide

Gareth and Nicole Beale

Avenue Campus: Building 65a Room 3043

Description: Churches help us to interpret the urban environment. In this session we will learn a few basic skills which can help to date churches and identify different styles. This session includes a visit to a local church.

Week 4

 

25/10/12

Historical Archives Part 1: The Historian’s Perspective

Adam Chapman

Avenue Campus: Building 65a Room 3043

Description: Adam Chapman, a historian specialising in medieval military history, will deliver a guest lecture on the use of historical archives to find out about the urban landscape’s more distant past.

Week 5

 

1/11/12

Historical Archives Part 2: Finding and using archives

Gareth Beale, Nicole Beale and Archivist

Meet in reception of Hartley Library, Highfield Campus

Description: This session will consist of two parts. Firstly, an introduction by Library Archivist to the range of historical archives that are available for researching into urban archaeology. Secondly, a practical exercise using primary and secondary sources available at Hartley Library to test our new skills.

Week 6

8/11/12

Commercial / Industrial Architecture

Gareth and Nicole Beale

Avenue Campus: Building 65a Room 3043

& Off site visit (within Highfield and Portswood area)

Description: An off site visit within the local landscape to introduce the class to types of commercial and industrial architecture, and how these shape the environment around us.

Week 7

 

15/11/12

How Archaeologists Use Objects

Gareth and Nicole Beale with guest

Avenue Campus: Building 65a Room 3043

Description: A session on how archaeologists use artefacts, many of which you may find in your own garden, to tell us about the everyday lives of Hampshire’s former residents.  A guest archaeologist will lead a practical on artefact identification and recording.

Week 8

 

22/11/12

Who Lived in a House Like This? Domestic Archaeology

Gareth and Nicole Beale with guest

Avenue Campus: Building 65a Room 3043

& Off site visit (within Highfield and Portswood area)

Description: Off site visit to the local area to observe changes in domestic building styles and how different styles of housing hint at changes in the lifestyles and aspiration of their inhabitants.

Add-on: We also covered Genealogy and Family History in this session.

Week 9

 

29/11/12

Cemeteries

Gareth and Nicole Beale

Avenue Campus: Building 65a Room 3043

& Highfield Church (weather dependent)

Description: Cemeteries can tell us a great deal about population changes, but also give insights into individuals’ lives. This session will help learners to use cemeteries and memorials to understand local history and archaeology. This session will include a practical on the use of innovative photographic techniques for the recording and sharing of memorials.

Week 10

 

6/12/12

Landscape

Gareth and Nicole Beale

Meet in reception of Hartley Library, Highfield Campus

& Highfield Campus Walk

Description: Often, the ground under our own feet can provide invaluable clues about the archaeology and history of the area around us. Using Highfield Campus as our case study, this session will begin with a field walk, ending with a practical in Hartley Library to introduce the class to landscape archaeology.

 

Week 11

 

13/12/12

Maps and how to use them

Gareth and Nicole Beale

TBC – likely Hartley Library, Highfield Campus / Avenue Campus

Description: Using the maps collection held at Hartley Library, this session will look at how maps can help us to see what was there at a point in history, as well as telling us a lot about the way that the map makers saw the world around them.  There will be a practical session using maps to find information about Hampshire.

 

Christmas Break

Week 12

 

10/1/13

Writing about Urban Archaeology and Final Roundup

Gareth and Nicole Beale

Avenue Campus: Building 65a Room 3043

Description: In this session we will look at different ways of writing about urban archaeology and different ways of publishing your research.

In the second half we will review the eleven previous meetings of the group.

At the end of the session, learners will be issued with their very own ‘Urban Archaeology Handbook’, which consists of information about all of the resources covered in the course, and suggested further reading.

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